Mathematics for Teaching Geogebra Mathlets – dynamic math applets

Mathlets – dynamic math applets

‘An applet is any small application that performs one specific task that runs within the scope of a larger program, often as a plug-in. An applet typically also refers to Java applets, i.e., programs written in theJava programming language that are included in a web page’ -Wikipedia. That settles it. It has nothing to do with Apple and small apples. What about mathlets? Yes, you guess it right that it is an applet about mathematics. Not, it’s not yet in the dictionary. But I find it cute and I intend to use it from now on to describe the math applets I have been creating since I started using GeoGebra to create dynamic worksheets for learning and discovering mathematics and not for demonstrating mathematics. Below is a list of mathlets which I posted in the new website AgIMat which contains resources in science and mathematics teaching.

GeoGebra mathlets are interactive web pages (html file) that consist of a dynamic figure (interactive applet) with corresponding explanations, questions and tasks for students. Students can use the dynamic worksheets both on local computers or via the Internet to work on the given tasks by modifying the dynamic figure.

Geometry

  1. Congruent segments
  2. Bisecting a segment
  3. Congruent angles
  4. Bisecting an angle
  5. SSS congruence
  6. SAS congruence
  7. ASA congruence

Graphs and Functions

  1. Coordinates system _1
  2. Coordinates system_2
  3. Coordinates system_3
  4. Introducing function
  5. Exponential function and its inverse
 

1 thought on “Mathlets – dynamic math applets”

  1. Hi Erlina,
    Welcome to the club! I have been using that term since the late-90s and may (or may not) have been preceded by Tom Leathrum who generously donated any claim he might have had on it to the MAA for use in its ‘Journal of Online Mathematics and its Applications’ (JOMA) – which has subsequently been incorporated into their MathDL ‘Loci’ online magazine. My own mathlets (and other stuff) are linked to from http://qpr.ca/math
    Congratulations (again) on your nice work.
    -Alan Cooper

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